Don’t get too comfortable with SLA’s

I have been working alot in Azure lately…more so than Office 365, but Office 365 still holds my heart. The other day there was a 5 hour outage with Visual Studio Team Services and Azure Active Directory. I monitored the situation, communicated to my colleagues and patiently waited it out. That night I got the health report that everything was fixed, so the next day I filed an SLA violation request.

It’s important to know where and how to determine SLA’s for Microsoft services, and they keep that on the volume licensing site.

http://www.microsoftvolumelicensing.com/DocumentSearch.aspx?Mode=3&DocumentTypeId=37

Visual studio itself has a 99.9% uptime SLA. Remember this is just an SLA and not a guarantee, if this is violated you get a 10% refund, and if it falls below 99% it’s a 25% refund

The calculation they use is simple enough

Monthly uptime % = (Max Avail Minutes – Downtime / Max Avail Minutes)

In my case, 5 hours x 60 minutes = 300

31x24x60 – 300 / 31x24x60

44340 / 44640 = %99.32

That puts me at 10%. At first I was excited. I get 10% of around $1000 back…yay me $100.

Wait a second…I heard from around 5 development teams that were down with a total of 20 developers if I am being conservative. Assuming not all of them were working in that moment in VSTS.

I was also conservative with their hourly rates since I don’t know what they make. Say they make $20/hour which is extremely conservative since developers more than likely make more than 40k/year.

20 developers x 20/hour x 5 hours = $2000.

Now SLA’s don’t seem like they are such a good deal. Like I said before, don’t fall in love with SLA’s I am still conservatively $1900 short and if I am being generous it looks more like $7400. My $100 refund doesn’t look so good now.

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